اللغة العربية
Home New Products
  •    
     

     

     

    Specialist in Environmental

    Air Quality Monitoring

  •    
     

     

     

    Better Performance in

    Measurement Solutions

  •    
     

     

     

    Multi Dimensional

    Analytical Solutions

  •    
     

     

     

    Scientific & LAB

    Instrumentation

  •    
     

     

     

    Product for Analytical Science

  •    
     

     

     

    Safe the Environment

   Home » Laboratory News » Vibrational Spectroscopy Gets Faster
 
Laboratory News
Drinking Water, from Sunshine
10/18/2016

An MIT team designed solar-powered portable desalination system to use in disaster zones and remote regions
.........Read full story


Squid Provide Insight into Human Hearing
10/18/2016

The ordinary squid, Loligo pealii—best known until now as a kind of floating buffet for just about any fish in the sea—may be on the verge of becoming a scientific superstar, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the sense of hearing
.........Read full story


Chemists Produce Biofuel from Used Cooking Oil
10/18/2016

A team of university chemists have demonstrated that cooking oil can be used and revalued, having managed to produce biodiesel from the used oil
.........Read full story


Greener is Happier
10/18/2015

Do human beings find more passion and meaning in working for the greater good—in realizing their jobs contribute more than just profit? The answer is yes
.........Read full story


eLegs Give Paraplegics Hope
10/18/2014

Berkeley Bionics unveiled eLEGS, a wearable, artificially intelligent, bionic device that powers paraplegics up to get them standing and walking
.........Read full story


China's Fastest Supercomputer Unveiled
10/15/2015

China's fastest supercomputer "Tianhe-1," is about to be equipped with Chinese-made central processing unit chips, meaning that China could rival the world's most powerful computers
.........Read full story


Watermelon Lowers Blood Pressure
10/15/2014

Evidence from a pilot study suggests that watermelon can be an effective natural weapon against prehypertension, a precursor to cardiovascular disease
.........Read full story


`SpectroPen' Can Detect Tumor Edges
10/15/2010

Biomedical engineers are developing a hand-held device called a SpectroPen that could help surgeons see the edges of tumors in human patients in real time during surgery
.........Read full story


Device Measures Mars’ Atmosphere
10/15/2010

Instruments designed by a UT Dallas professor to measure atmospheric components on the surface of Mars have uncovered important clues about the planet’s atmosphere and climate history
.........Read full story


Vibrational Spectroscopy Gets Faster
10/15/2010

A paper by researchers at NIST may breathe new life into the use of a powerful—but tricky—diagnostic technique for cell biology
.........Read full story


 
 
Latest Headlines
Medtronic gets OK to study heart valve in US
Ratings agencies maintain views on St. Jude
St. Jude agrees to buy AGA Medical for $1.04B
Solta Medical acquires acne laser maker CLRS
Health insurers help GOP after dalliance with Dems
Insulet Corporation to Report Third Quarter 2010 Financial Results on Tuesday,
Summary Box: GE to buy diagnostics firm Clarient
Read More
 
Vibrational Spectroscopy Gets Faster

A paper by researchers at NIST may breathe new life into the use of a powerful—but tricky—diagnostic technique for cell biology. 

The paper, appearing this week in the Biophysical Journal, demonstrates that with improved hardware and better signal processing, a powerful form of molecular vibration spectroscopy can quickly deliver detailed molecular maps of the contents of cells without damaging them. Earlier studies have suggested that to be useful, the technique would need power levels too high for cells. 

The technique, "B-CARS," is one of several variations on Raman spectroscopy, which measures the frequencies associated with different modes of vibration of atoms and their bonds in a molecule. 

The exact mix of these frequencies is an extremely discriminating "fingerprint" for any particular molecule, so Raman spectroscopy has been used as a chemical microscope, able to detail the structure of complex objects by mapping the chemical composition at each point in a three-dimensional space. 

In the biosciences, according to NIST chemist Marcus Cicerone, Raman spectroscopy has been used to detect microscopic cellular components such as mitochondria, detect how stem cells differentiate into new forms and distinguish between subtly different cell and tissue types. 

It can, for example, detect minor differences between various precancerous and cancerous cells, potentially providing valuable medical diagnostic information. Even better, it does this without the need to add fluorescent dyes or other chemical tags to identify specific proteins. 

The catch, says Cicerone, is speed. The usual method, spontaneous Raman scattering takes a long time to gather enough data to generate a single spectrum—as much as seven minutes for fine detail—and that's for each point in the image. 

"Seven minutes or even five seconds per spectrum is not feasible when we need a million spectra for an image," he observes. CARS, which uses a pair of lasers to pump up the vibrational states and increase signal, is part of the answer. The current breakthroughs for a broadband CARS instrument developed at NIST since 2004, says Cicerone, gets the same information in 50 milliseconds per pixel. 

The new catch is power. Recent papers have argued that to get the necessary data, the lasers used in CARS must run at power levels above the damage threshold for living cells, making the technique nearly useless for clinical purposes. Not quite, according to the NIST team. 

Their paper describes a combination of improved hardware to gather spectra over a very broad range of wavelengths, and a clever mathematical technique that effectively amplifies the useable signal by examining a portion of signal normally ignored as background interference. 

The result, says Cicerone, pushes their minimum power level below the damage threshold while retaining the speed of CARS. "We have all the information that you have in a Raman spectrum but we get it 5 to 100 times faster," he says, adding that some obvious modifications should push that higher, opening the door to more widespread use of vibrational spectroscopy in both biology and clinical diagnosis. 

Source: NIST

 
 
 
 
 
Copyright © 2010 Labomatic All rights reserved.
Designed By : SAUDI SOFTECH